An argument of aristotle on eudemonia as the highest good in the book nicomachean ethics

In one of several important methodological remarks he makes near the beginning of the Nicomachean Ethics, he says that in order to profit from the sort of study he is undertaking, one must already have been brought up in good habits b4—6.

For it seems, from these considerations, that even if anything whether good or evil penetrates to them, it must be something weak and negligible, either in itself or for them, or if not, at least it must be such in degree and kind as not to make happy those who are not happy nor to take away their blessedness from those who are.

That is why he stresses that in this sort of study one must be satisfied with conclusions that hold only for the most part b11— And yet to have a friend is to want to benefit someone for that other person's sake; it is not a merely self-interested strategy.

Aristotle places those who suffer from such internal disorders into one of three categories: Because each party benefits the other, it is advantageous to form such friendships.

Aristotle's Ethics

Soldiers who are not prudent act with cowardice, and soldiers who do not have temperance act with recklessness. So the pleasures of creatures different in kind differ in kind, and it is plausible to suppose that those of a single species do not differ.

He himself warns us that his initial statement of what happiness is should be treated as a rough outline whose details are to be filled in later a20— Aristotle's teachings spread through the Mediterranean and the Middle East, where some early Islamic regimes allowed rational philosophical descriptions of the natural world.

For Aristotle, this happiness is our highest goal. Still, every one supposes that they live and therefore that they are active; we cannot suppose them to sleep like Endymion. And that all these attributes belong most of all to the philosopher is manifest.

Having read Book VI and completed our study of what these two forms of wisdom are, how are we better able to succeed in finding the mean in particular situations?

Aristotle's Ethics

If we were to run through them all, the circumstances of action would be found trivial and unworthy of gods. Now of first principles we see some by induction, some by perception, some by a certain habituation, and others too in other ways. Further, since of the things answering to one Idea there is one science, there would have been one science of all the goods; but as it is there are many sciences even of the things that fall under one category, e.

The student of politics, then, must study the soul, and must study it with these objects in view, and do so just to the extent which is sufficient for the questions we are discussing; for further precision is perhaps something more laborious than our purposes require.

Determining what is kalon is difficult b28—33, a24—30and the normal human aversion to embracing difficulties helps account for the scarcity of virtue b10— One might object that people who are sick or who have moral deficiencies can experience pleasure, even though Aristotle does not take them to be in a natural state.

And perhaps one might even suppose this to be, rather than honour, the end of the political life. Egoism, in other words, can be treated as a purely formal thesis: Similarly, when he says that murder and theft are always wrong, he does not mean that wrongful killing and taking are wrong, but that the current system of laws regarding these matters ought to be strictly enforced.

As activities are different, then, so are the corresponding pleasures. But what is this right reason, and by what standard horos is it to be determined? Note that ignorance of what aims are good and bad, such as people of bad character always have, is not something people typically excuse as ignorance in this sense.

Eudaimonia

Those who wish good things to their friends for the sake of the latter are friends most of all, because they do so because of their friends themselves, and not coincidentally.

In this respect, Aristotle says, the virtues are no different from technical skills: Therefore, the supreme Good should be an activity of the rational soul in accordance with virtue. Is it not plain from the corresponding activities?

External goods are also necessary in such a virtuous life, because a person who lacks things such as good family and friends might find it difficult to be happy. Choice is also not wishing for things one does not believe can be achieved, such as immortality, but rather always concerning realistic aims.

Likewise, it is from the soul i. The rest of this Book is a discussion of the various kinds of intellectual virtues: And one might ask the question, what in the world they mean by 'a thing itself', is as is the case in 'man himself' and in a particular man the account of man is one and the same.

That is why Aristotle says that what is judged pleasant by a good man really is pleasant, because the good man is the measure of things a15— Rather his idea seems to be that in addition to our full-fledged reasoning capacity, we also have psychological mechanisms that are capable of a limited range of reasoning.

Clearly, then, goods must be spoken of in two ways, and some must be good in themselves, the others by reason of these. Someone who has made no observations of astronomical or biological phenomena is not yet equipped with sufficient data to develop an understanding of these sciences.

But let us discuss these matters elsewhere; an objection to what we have said, however, may be discerned in the fact that the Platonists have not been speaking about all goods, and that the goods that are pursued and loved for themselves are called good by reference to a single Form, while those which tend to produce or to preserve these somehow or to prevent their contraries are called so by reference to these, and in a secondary sense.

Aristotle's approach is similar:The Nicomachean Ethics (Ancient Greek: Ἠθικὰ Νικομάχεια) is the name normally given to Aristotle's best-known work on ethics. The work, which plays a pre-eminent role in defining Aristotelian ethics, consists of ten books, originally separate scrolls, and is understood to be based on notes from his lectures at the Lyceum/5.

Aristotle’s work, The Nicomachean Ethics, consists of numerous books pertaining to Aristotle’s Ethics—the ethics of the good life. The first book discloses Aristotle’s belief on moral philosophy and the correlation between virtue and happiness. Aristotle discusses pleasure in two separate parts of the Nicomachean Ethics (book 7 chapters and book 10 chapters ).

Plato had discussed similar themes in several dialogues, including the Republic and the Philebus and Gorgias. Jul 03,  · It is an assumption of Aristotle’s philosophy of nature that the highest good of each species is accessible to all, or nearly all, its members.

For man the highest good is wisdom. Nicomachean Ethics is a philosophical inquiry into the nature of the good life for a human being. Aristotle begins the work by positing that there exists some ultimate good toward which, in the final analysis, all human actions ultimately aim.

A summary of Book I in Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of Nicomachean Ethics and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans.

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An argument of aristotle on eudemonia as the highest good in the book nicomachean ethics
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